The e3 Tradition

With e3 right around the corner myself, and several other avid and casual gamers pretty much have their pitchforks ready.

We live in an age, particularly with movies and video games where fan criticism (whether it’s on social media or direct messages to the development team) pale in comparison to financial gain.

What I mean is, the input is considered, but the profit number is considered much more substantially. This is just good business in industries bordering monopoly. There’s no competition to force EA Games, for instance, to recall their over-reaching micro-transactions. Plus the micro-transactions themselves assure profit.

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Do you remember?: “Mean Creek”

I read a few comments on this Reddit post as a handful of redditors lackadaisically pieced together the plot of the film.

I remember loving it, but in a ‘shock and awe’ kind of manner. Obviously I was attracted to the cast being 12 years old when the film was released.

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The divisiveness of all “Roseanne” and the responsibility of being a public figure

Roseanne Barr tweeted something disgusting and racist and ABC prompty cancelled her revival sitcom.

Okay, now that you’re caught up…

To some people (actually most people unfortunately) politics is more about faith than it is about facts.

Roseanne Barr was never the kind of person to shy away from giving her political opinion, no matter how controversial or atypical to left-leaning Hollywood.

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The exhaustive bombardment of Star Wars origin stories

This is frustrating.

I get it. We live in a world where big-budget films are only created if there is concrete data they will make profit.

To Disney executive the data clearly states “Put an Avenger in it or put “Star Wars” in the title and it will profit.”

I’ve ranted time and time again about the lack of creativity currently in the Marvel and “Star Wars” universes. So I’ll spare “ranting” and come down to their level.

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How “Silicon Valley” turned its greatest weakness into its greatest strength

When writers outline their script it’s important to try and understand how the audience feels, essentially about everything.

Dialogue can tell us a lot about character, but I want to focus on the structure of story itself.

Seasons 1 and 2 of “Silicon Valley” were hilarious and probably the funniest we’ll ever see the show. Season 3 lagged as fans and critics felt we were stuck in a cycle of failure and success.

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“13 Reasons Why” Season 1 worked. Season 2 was always a bad idea.

13 Reasons Why season one was solid.

There were ebbs and flows throughout the season, but overall it was a strong mystery with a satisfying, yet devastating conclusion.

Everything comes together. Without questionable cliffhangers it would’ve been a strong mini-series and critics agree.

Katherine Langford earned a well-deserved Golden Globe nomination and the critics landed on an admirable 76.

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Loud internet fandom reveals inherit faults in aged Nielson rating system (this could’ve been a headline a decade ago!)

The Nielson ratings are absurd and just about every major network still swears by them.

Earlier this month shows such as “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and “The Expanse” were cancelled. Several other shows were cancelled along with them.

However these two specific shows had loud fanbases. “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” was rescued by NBC and “The Expanse,” as of now still cancelled, has fans flying plane banners attempting to resucue the SyFy series.

On Wednesday “The Expanse” was met again with a subpar Nielson rating. The outcry is so strong though, that I feel confident it will be picked up.

Back in the “Firefly” and “Freaks and Geeks” days the internet wasn’t this massive community of outspoken, pissed off people.

The Nielson metric was obsolete over a decade ago. Every show my wife and I watch isn’t contributed to their number, and the same can be said of millions of people across the country.

Time to update.