Emmy Winner Predictions – July 2018

As far as surprising nominations come – there weren’t many.

The Emmys can be frustratingly safe as they reluctantly bring in new shows. It appears that “The Handmaid’s Tale” feels pretty safe in most categories, but in the comedy categories it was hard for me to figure out if they’d lean toward “Atlanta” or “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.”

I may flip flop a few times…

Anyway here’s the predictions and as always keep here for the most up-to-date predictions:


Outstanding Drama Series (07/13/18)
The Handmaid’s Tale
This is Us
Game of Thrones
The Crown
The Americans
Stranger Things
Westworld


Outstanding Comedy Series (07/13/18)
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Atlanta
Black-ish
Barry
GLOW
Curb Your Enthusiasm
Silicon Valley
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

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MoviePass and the innovation it inspires

I had an interesting conversation once about the illegal downloading of movies, shows and music.

This person was applying the generalized stereotype that all young people today want everything for free. In political discussion I’ve given myself a rule to avoid generalizations: I believe grouping people together lacks the nuance of the stereotype to begin with. Also, had the ability to download movies illegal happened 100 years ago, the result would’ve likely remained the same.

I try to avoid generalizations the same way I try to avoid absolutisms. I aim to remove “always” and “never” from my vocabulary since they are always exaggerations. If I were to engage a republican citizen by saying “All republicans want…” then I endanger my potential connection to this person with varying opinions.

 

People don’t appreciate being lumped into categories because we all believe we are complex individuals. So when the topic of “MoviePass” comes up I’ll avoid saying “It will never succeed” even as their stock prices plummet and the keep hemorrhaging money.

I’m a huge supporter of MoviePass and I believe their business model is incredibly risky, but has the potential to succeed. I’m eagerly anticipating the numbers in movie theater attendance when compared to last year when summer films had the lowest box office since 2006.

AMC announced their new premium plan recently at $20 a month. For those of us closer to an AMC theater and don’t like MoviePass’ new restrictions on re-viewings or multiple viewings, this may be enough to unsubscribe from MoviePass and try this new plan.

For this rest of us, MoviePass is still the most affordable option and the new restrictions aren’t nearly enough to urge us to leave them.

As I mentioned before, things aren’t looking good for MoviePass. But now, when/if they fall, we already have an alternative plan to subscribe to. If it holds out long enough, we may see Regal and other theater chains roll out competitive plans as well.

When music started being stolen regularly on the internet with the inventions of Napster and sharing programs like Limewire, we soon saw the music industry partner with Apple to find a more accessible way for users to buy music.

Now it’s much easier to just like a button in the iTunes app and pay $1.29 for a song you enjoy, than it is to download illegal copies. Not that illegally downloading music ever really had a significant impact on the music industry, but what it did do was encourage and inspire innovation in already established industries.

If MoviePass’ new plan had never existed, would we have got this new AMC deal?

Competition is the key ingredient in a capitalist society, right? However our movie, TV, and music industries become more and more monopolized each year and the lack of competition discourages this innovation.

Competition = Innovation.

MoviePass started competitive market in theater subscriptions services, they took a bold risk and I will likely fail, but it’s lasting impact will be worth so much to your average movie-goer for decades to come.

The divisiveness of all “Roseanne” and the responsibility of being a public figure

Roseanne Barr tweeted something disgusting and racist and ABC prompty cancelled her revival sitcom.

Okay, now that you’re caught up…

To some people (actually most people unfortunately) politics is more about faith than it is about facts.

Roseanne Barr was never the kind of person to shy away from giving her political opinion, no matter how controversial or atypical to left-leaning Hollywood.

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How “Silicon Valley” turned its greatest weakness into its greatest strength

When writers outline their script it’s important to try and understand how the audience feels, essentially about everything.

Dialogue can tell us a lot about character, but I want to focus on the structure of story itself.

Seasons 1 and 2 of “Silicon Valley” were hilarious and probably the funniest we’ll ever see the show. Season 3 lagged as fans and critics felt we were stuck in a cycle of failure and success.

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“13 Reasons Why” Season 1 worked. Season 2 was always a bad idea.

13 Reasons Why season one was solid.

There were ebbs and flows throughout the season, but overall it was a strong mystery with a satisfying, yet devastating conclusion.

Everything comes together. Without questionable cliffhangers it would’ve been a strong mini-series and critics agree.

Katherine Langford earned a well-deserved Golden Globe nomination and the critics landed on an admirable 76.

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Loud internet fandom reveals inherit faults in aged Nielson rating system (this could’ve been a headline a decade ago!)

The Nielson ratings are absurd and just about every major network still swears by them.

Earlier this month shows such as “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and “The Expanse” were cancelled. Several other shows were cancelled along with them.

However these two specific shows had loud fanbases. “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” was rescued by NBC and “The Expanse,” as of now still cancelled, has fans flying plane banners attempting to resucue the SyFy series.

On Wednesday “The Expanse” was met again with a subpar Nielson rating. The outcry is so strong though, that I feel confident it will be picked up.

Back in the “Firefly” and “Freaks and Geeks” days the internet wasn’t this massive community of outspoken, pissed off people.

The Nielson metric was obsolete over a decade ago. Every show my wife and I watch isn’t contributed to their number, and the same can be said of millions of people across the country.

Time to update.