Preview: The Potential of “Gone Girl”

Gillian Flynn is a popular novelist, early she wrote two books titled “Sharp Objects” and “Dark Places.” But her novel “Gone Girl” would become her most successful, both critically and financially. Flynn was formerly a writer for Entertainment Weekly; she now finds a film-adaptation of her most successful novel on the cover.

“Gone Girl” is the story of a rocky marriage between Nick and Amy Dunne. On their fifth anniversary Amy goes missing. The novel’s principal suspense comes from an uncertainty about Nick, and whether or not he killed his wife.

1294cover-EWThe novel was #1 on the New York Times Hardcover Bestseller list for eight weeks upon release. It received positive reviews universally. Critic’s admired the novels suspense, plot twists, and examination of a corrosive marriage.

It wasn’t long before a film adaptation was in talks. The project became buzz-worthy when director David Fincher became attached. The book’s author, Gillian Flynn, signed on to write the screenplay adaptation herself. It has been mentioned that the adaptation may derail a little bit from the novel in the third act, but it may just be a rumor.

David Fincher’s past films “Se7en” and “Zodiac” were masterful thrillers. He is taken strides in the suspense genre, a genre only the great Alfred Hitchcock could surpass him in. Fincher’s last three projects have been strongly admired, including “The Social Network,” “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” and creating the series “House of Cards” on Netflix.

Two time Oscar nominee Jeff Cronenworth is the cinematographer. Much like the rest of the above-the-line crew he has worked with Fincher multiple times in the past on projects such as “The Social Network,” “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” and “Fight Club.”

dd897ae16bffa79b81d4851c012f7c3915e9faedOther alumni from previous Fincher projects includes production designer Donald Graham Burt (The Social Network, Benjamin Button, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Zodiac), composers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross (won 2011 Original Score Oscar for “The Social Network”), and 2-time Oscar winning editor Kirk Baxter (The Social Network, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Benjamin Button).

The cast, however, was perplexing. Ben Affleck is in the lead as Nick, currently shrouded in “Batman vs. Superman” buzz, he hasn’t received the same glowing accolades as an actor that he has as a director. Rosamund Pike plays Amy which is said to be a very baity role for the actress. The supporting cast consists of Neil Patrick Harris, Tyler Perry, and Carrie Coon. That is quite a cast of characters, but under proper direction any actor can deliver on levels they haven’t reached before.

140707gone-girl1_300x206PROS

– David Fincher. Currently one of the most consistent directors in Hollywood. Throughout the current decade, and the last decade, he has delivered critical hit after critical hit.

– David Fincher’s crew. A director isn’t anything without their crew, and each member of the above-the-line crew has helped Fincher on multiple projects of his. Many are Oscar-winners.

– Entertainment Weekly Cover. Any publicity is good publicity. It’s difficult to get a modern audience into a theater for something that’s not an action movie, being financially successful can definitely help with the film’s buzz.

– Based on a Critically acclaimed novel where the novelist is the screenwriter.

– Rosamund Pike in the role as Amy Dunne. Even without the film being screened yet, she tops many Oscar prognosticator’s lists for Best Actress.

CONS

– Many prognosticators have also claimed the premise may be too bizarre for Oscars. However, as movie-goers, this isn’t a con at all. Something different is something good.

– Casting choices. Beside Rosamund Pike, everyone has thought that this cast is questionable, not being a typical Oscar-star-studded cast. But as mentioned before: under proper direction any actor can deliver.

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